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Grande Prairie Man Charged for Importing Drugs

Grande Prairie… A 39-year-old Grande Prairie man has been arrested following allegations he attempted to import Oxycodone pills from overseas via a courier parcel.

   

The Alberta Law Enforcement Response Teams (ALERT) and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) collaborated to arrest Trenton William Zeyha, on July 28th, at a Grande Prairie residence. Zeyha is facing charges of possession for the purpose of trafficking and importation.

 

   

CBSA officers at the Edmonton International Airport intercepted the Grande Prairie-bound parcel on July 23rd. The package was declared as “cotton cross stitch” and contained five cross stitch patterns. Officers closely examined the patterns and noted they were sealed on all sides. Once pulled back, each pattern revealed 55 pills, for a combined total of 275 Oxycodone pills. The parcel was seized and ALERT was notified. 

   

ALERT was able to facilitate an arrest with the assistance of RCMP Grande Prairie members.

   

Oxycodone is a prescription opioid pain medication with similar properties to heroin and morphine. Oxycodone is typically one of the most abused prescription medications in Canada. Last year, ALERT seized nearly 5,000 Oxycodone pills from across the province, versus less than 400 the previous year. 

   

ALERT was established and is funded by the Alberta Government and is a compilation of the province’s most sophisticated law enforcement resources committed to tackling serious and organized crime. Nearly 400 municipal police, RCMP, and sheriffs work in ALERT.

   

Child Sexual Abuse Material (CSAM) involves images and/or videos that depict the sexual abuse of minors – the majority of which involve prepubescent children. Often, CSAM involves explicit and/or extreme sexual assaults against the child victim (Cybertip.ca).

Learn more about Internet Child Exploitation and ALERT’s integrated teams combatting this issue.

Ghost Guns are illegal, privately manufactured firearms or lower receivers. These weapons are often made with 3D-printers, and undermine public safety due to their lack of licensing requirements, serialization and safety controls.

Learn more about Ghost Guns on ALERT’s dedicated Privately Manufactured Firearms info page